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The United States federal government should substantially increase its protection of water resources in the United States. (Bibliography)

The United States federal government should substantially increase its protection of water resources in the United States. (Bibliography)

General Books Confronting the Nations’s Water Problems Journals Journal of Water Resources and Protection Water Resources Articles Flint The Unfinished Business of Flint’s Water Crisis (2020) The Poisoned City: Flint’s Water and the American Urban Tragedy (2019). Book Poisoned Water: How the Citizens of Flint, Michigan, Fought for Their Lives and Warned the Nation (2020) Book Flint Fights Back Environmental Justice and Democracy in the Flint Water Crisis (2019) What

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The United States federal government should substantially increase its protection of water resources in the United States. (Argument Outline)

Daily Update. Topicality USFG(a) Central government in Washington, DC(b) All 3 branches SHOULD (a) Ought SUBSTANTIALLY (a) of real worth or importance(b) In the mail(c) Without material qualification(d) A certain percentage INCREASE (a) To make greater WATER RESOURCES IN (a) “In” means “throughout”(b) “In means “within” UNITED STATES (a) Everywhere(b) Military resources(c) federal lands(d) Tribal areas Advantages Agriculture (article)Health Harms(a) General(b) Small particulatesEnvironmental HarmsEPA CredibilityRacism/Environmental Justice TerrorismWater Shortages (article) Water

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The United States federal government should substantially increase its protection of water resources in the United States. (Daily Update)

PFAS chemicals in water need regulated by the federal government.  These chemicals are deadly in the body and threaten the environment Annie Sneed, 1-22, 21, Scientific American, Forever Chemicals Are Widespread in U.S. Drinking Water, https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/forever-chemicals-are-widespread-in-u-s-drinking-water/ [Full study referenced in the article — https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.estlett.0c00713] Many Americans fill up a glass of water from their faucet without worrying whether it might be dangerous. But the crisis of lead-tainted water in Flint,

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Policy Camp 2020 Caselist

Camp Files (Free with Registration) Affirmative Cases Abolish the Criminal Justice System (Georgetown, Gonzaga, UTNIF) Abolish ICE  (Gonzaga, SDI, Umich) Cyber Deterrence (Umich) Cyber Digital evidence standard (U mich) Cyber Standards (Georgetown) Decarceration (SDI) Strict Scrutiny to collateral consequcnes (Umich) Reduce Sorbanes Oxley coroprate penalties (Umich) Death Penalty abolition (Umich, SDI, Georgetown) Marijuana legalization (UMich, SDI) Drug Legalization (Umich, Broader) Mandatory Minimums (Gonzaga) Qualified immunity elimination (Gonzaga) Use of Force

College Policy Alliances Topic

August 16 Present at the Disruption How Trump Unmade U.S. Foreign Policy The Democratic Renewal What It Will Take to Fix U.S. Foreign Policy August 15 What America can learn from the fall of the roman Republic What if the power grid went dark? August 12 Conflict with small powers derails US foreign policy June Rethinking restraint: Why it fails in practice  Emerging technologies and the future of CRBN terrorism

General Policy Daily Update

We are in a depression now Robert Samuelson, Augusts 9, 2020, https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-call-it-what-it-is-were-in-a-pandemic-depression/2020/08/09/3904faf4-d8e5-11ea-aff6-220dd3a14741_story.html?hpid=hp_save-opinions-float-right-4-0_opinion-card-d-right%3Ahomepage%2Fstory-ans, Let’s call it what it is. We’re in a Pandemic Depression. It must be clear to almost everyone by now that the sudden and sharp economic downturn that began in late March is something more than a severe recession. That label was, perhaps, justifiable for the 2007-2009 Great Recession, when unemployment reached a peak of 10 percent. It isn’t